Boom in number of daycare centres

Quality concerns have parents increasingly turning to private daycare centres for their children Organic food requirements, more field trips and fewer days closed are just some of the advantages that have led to a tenfold increase in the number of...

Organic food requirements, more field trips and fewer days closed are just some of the advantages that have led to a tenfold increase in the number of private daycare centres in the past two years, according to Berlingske Tidende newspaper.

A newly released study from daycare centres' national union, DLO, indicated that there are 172 private daycare centres across the country, with 30 more awaiting approval to open. Two years ago there were 19.

DLO believes the number of new private daycares will increase by around 500 in the next few years. In addition, the cost of public daycare has risen sharply over the past few years and many parents say extras offered by private centres make it an easy choice.

'In private daycare centre's there is a closer interaction between administrators, children and parents. They decide amongst themselves how things will be set up,' said Jens Torp, president of daycare association Frie Børnehaver og Fritidshjem.

Karen Ellemann, family affairs spokeswoman for the prime minister's Liberal Party, said she was 'satisfied' with the quality of public daycare. But Mette Frederisken, the Social Democratic social affairs spokeswoman, called DLO's figures 'threatening'.

The 2005 law allowing private daycare centres lets individual institutions set their own admission costs. The centres do receive a partial subsidy from their local council, but must recruit and market on their own.

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