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Historic crime investigation was quashed

Repressed documentation relating to Denmark's most famous political crime gang could have convicted the members prior to the killing of a police officer

A former Copenhagen police officer's statements after 20 years of silence indicate there was enough evidence to bring the infamous Blekinge gang to justice before its last heist, but it was suppressed by another police force.

The gang was a leftist organisation consisting of seven men who committed a series of brazen robberies in the 1980s. Their final, tragic heist resulted in the death of a young police officer.

Jan Andersen, a former detective inspector with Copenhagen Police, told Berlingske Tidende in an interview that he and a colleague investigating one of the gang's robberies in 1988 were denied access to pertinent materials by police in the city suburb of Lyngby.

Andersen said that the information could have led to arrests that would have prevented the gang's theft of nearly $2 million at a city post office later that year, during which a 22-year-old police officer was gunned down.

'If we had just been given the names of the gang's members at that time, it could have made a world of difference,' Andersen said in the interview.

The subsequent trials for the Blekinge gang members resulted in 10 years imprisonment for three of them and an 8-year sentence to a Swiss man who was also involved in the robbery and shooting.

Lyngby's current police force denied any knowledge of the circumstances surrounding Andersen's investigation being hindered. Several parliament members are now demanding a new investigation into the possible misconduct surrounding the repression of the evidence.

'Now the government has to lay all their cards on the table,' said Karen Hækkerup, the Social Democratic spokesperson on political affairs. 'The new information absolutely requires that the prime minister pulls the case up out from the archives.' (RC)

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